This decadent chocolate souffle is dark and intense in flavor, yet light and silky in texture. Follow my easy step-by-step process to master how to make a chocolate souffle like a French pastry chef. Two chocolate souffles on a piece of black slate.

Why this recipe is so great:

This luxurious chocolate souffle is rich and extremely chocolatey. It’s not overly sweet, just sweet enough to balance the bold chocolate flavor. There are three layers to the texture of this souffle which makes it so incredible. The thin top layer is crisp and crackly. When you first spoon into this dessert there is a light crack that will remind you of a creme brulee. Then you reach into the center where you’ll find a thick molten chocolate sauce similar to a lava cake. The bottom layer is light and airy like a chocolate mousse. All the components just melt in your mouth with a smooth velvety finish. Souffles have a reputation for being difficult and tricky to make, but they’re actually quite easy once you understand the process.

For this recipe, all you need is chocolate, butter, sugar, eggs, vanilla, cream of tartar (or white vinegar) and salt – just seven basic ingredients. Here are some reviews:

“I haven’t tried making souffle since my last failed attempt, but after seeing your recipe I thought I would give it another try. It was a HUGE SUCCESS!!! Beautiful high rise and tasted amazing – thank you!” – Joanne

“I made this for dessert for Father’s Day. It was so easy and DELICIOUS! We all enjoyed it. I will definitely make it again. Thank you!!” – Nancy

How to make chocolate souffle:

chopped chocolate in a double-broiler Step 1 Melt The Chocolate – You begin by melting 4oz of semi-sweet baking squares over a double-boiler. If you don’t have a double-boiler, just place a large heat-proof glass bowl over a medium saucepan as I did. Fill the saucepan with about 1 inch of water. You don’t want the bowl to touch the water. Bring to a low simmer and melt the chocolate until smooth. Stir in 1 tablespoon of butter, 1 teaspoon of vanilla and a pinch of salt. Set aside to cool. You can also melt the chocolate in the microwave if you prefer. Chop the chocolate into small uniform pieces. Heat the chocolate in a microwave-safe bowl in 30-second bursts and stir in between each burst until completely melted.

Step 2 Preheat The Oven – Preheat your oven to 400F and position a rack on the lowest rung. This allows for the souffle to cook from the bottom and rise up a bit more. This also prevents the top from over-browning before it’s done. two ramekins butter and coated with sugar Step 3 Prepare The Ramekins – To prepare your baking cups, brush with melted butter, and sprinkle with sugar to coat the bottom and sides of the cups. The sugar gives the souffle something to grip onto as it rises. The yield of this recipe depends on the size of your ramekins. It yields about 3-4 small size, 2-3 medium size, or 2 large size ramekins. It also depends on how high you fill them. I like to fill mine right to the top for a nice rise above. a whisk attachment showing egg whites beaten to stiff peaks Step 4 Make The Meringue – Beat your egg white to stiff peaks. How can you tell when you’ve reached stiff peaks? When you stop your beater and the meringue stays still. You can test this by lifting your whisk up and there should be a nice point on the top. Make sure your eggs are at room temperature before you separate them. Room temperature egg whites beat up much faster than cold egg whites. You can leave the eggs out for an hour to bring to temperature or place the eggs in a bowl of warm water for about 5-10 minutes. melted chocolate with two egg yolks Step 5 Make The Chocolate Mixture – Now as your chocolate cools, it will thicken and may appear dull, but not to worry, once you stir in your egg yolks it will be smooth and glossy again. chocolate mixture with a dollop of meringue Step 6 Combine The Meringue With The Chocolate Mixture – Stir in one third of your meringue to lighten up the density of the chocolate mixture. combining beaten egg whites with a chocolate mixture to make souffle Gently fold in the remaining meringue in two equal parts until no white streaks remain, using an under and over motion to maintain as much of the air in the meringue as possible because that’s what will give the souffle its structure. Once you’re done, the batter will look like a soft chocolate mousse. Two chocolate souffles ready to be baked Step 7 Fill The Ramekins – Spoon the batter into the prepared ramekins. You can fill each ramekin 3/4 full, or as I like to do, fill it all the way to the top, and level it off with the flat edge of a knife to make a smooth surface. Then run your thumb along the inside edge of the ramekin about 1/4″ deep, making a small channel between the batter and the dish. This creates a nice round mushroom top as it rises and prevents the tops from cracking. Take a clean dish towel and wipe the outside of the ramekins clean and place them on a baking sheet.

Step 8 Bake The Souffles – Bake at 400F for 10-12 minutes on the lowest rack. I used 4oz baking cups which took exactly 10 minutes, but that might vary slightly depending on your oven. A 6oz size baking cup will take about 11-13 minutes, and an 8oz size will take about 13-15 minutes. The souffle will rise during the last few minutes. Mine started to rise at about 8 minutes and finished at 10 minutes. Do not open the oven while your souffle is baking. The cold air rushing in could affect the rise. Just turn on the oven light and look through the glass to check on them.

Troubleshooting:

  • Why did my chocolate seize or become grainy when I tried to melt it? – Melting chocolate can be finicky. Any bit of moisture will cause it to seize, which is when melted chocolate becomes stiff all of a sudden. This can happen when you’re using the double-broiler method and a tiny bit of water splashes or any steam gets onto the chocolate. Over-heating can cause chocolate to burn and become grainy. This can happen in the microwave if the power is too high or it’s been heated too long. So just pay attention when you melt your chocolate.
  • Why did my souffle not rise? – There are many reasons like over-mixing the batter or the oven wasn’t hot enough. But the most common reason would be the egg whites were not beaten to stiff peaks and therefore not strong enough to give the souffle its structure.
  • Why did my souffle crack? – It could be due to over-beaten egg whites resulting in a dry cracked souffle or most likely due to over baking.

How to make chocolate souffle in advance:

You can make this recipe 24 hours in advance. Just cover your ramekins with saran wrap and refrigerate until ready to bake. Remove the saran wrap, smooth the tops, run your thumb along the edge to make the channel, and bake for 1-2 minutes longer.

How to serve chocolate souffle:

It’s best to serve immediately. That way they are nice and warm and puffed up. The souffle will start to deflate soon after you take them out of the oven. Serve with a dusting of powdered sugar, a dollop of whipped cream, a drizzle of creme anglaise or a scoop vanilla ice cream if desired. two chocolate souffles, one with a spoonful taken out of it.

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Chocolate Souffle – Easy Foolproof Method


  • Author: Lily Ernst
  • Prep Time: 20 min
  • Cook Time: 10 min
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: 3

Description

This decadent chocolate souffle is dark and intense in flavor, yet light and silky in texture. Follow my easy step-by-step process to master how to make a chocolate souffle like a French pastry chef.


Ingredients

For the ramekins (4oz):

  • 1 tbsp unsalted butter, melted
  • 3 tsp granulated sugar

Chocolate base:

  • 4 oz semi-sweet chocolate baking squares, chopped
  • 1 tbsp unsalted butter
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • pinch of salt
  • 2 large egg yolks

Meringue:

  • 2 large egg whites, room temperature
  • 1/2 tsp cream of tartar (or 1 tsp white vinegar)
  • 2 tbsp granulated sugar

Optional:

  • powdered sugar for dusting

Instructions

  1. Melt the chocolate over a double-broiler until completely melted. Remove from heat. Stir in the butter, vanilla and salt. Set aside to cool.
  2. Preheat the oven to 400F and position a rack on the lowest rung.
  3. Brush three 4oz ramekins with butter. Sprinkle with sugar to coat and tap out the excess.
  4. Beat the egg whites until frothy. Add the cream of tartar and continue beating until opaque. Slowly add in the sugar while the mixer is running. Beat until stiff and glossy. Set aside.
  5. Stir the egg yolks into the chocolate mixture until smooth. Stir in one third of the meringue to lighten up the mixture.
  6. Gently fold in the remaining thirds, one at a time, using an under and over motion. Mix JUST until you see no more white streaks.
  7. Spoon the batter into the prepared ramekins. Fill all the way to the top. Use the flat edge of a knife to smooth the tops. Run your thumb along the rim to create a channel. Wipe the ramekins clean with a dish towel.
  8. Place the ramekins on a baking sheet. Bake for about 10-12 minutes or until the souffles have risen and the tops are lightly browned.
  9. Carefully transfer the ramekins using a dish towel onto your serving plates. Using oven mitts might cause you to bang the tops, so using a dish towel is recommended. Dust with powdered sugar if desired and serve immediately.

Notes

Troubleshooting:

  • Why did my chocolate seize or become grainy when I tried to melt it? – Melting chocolate can be finicky. Any bit of moisture will cause it to seize, which is when melted chocolate all of a sudden becomes stiff. This can happen when you’re using the double-broiler method and a tiny bit of water splashes or any steam gets onto the chocolate. Over-heating can cause chocolate to burn and become grainy. This can happen in the microwave if the power is too high or it’s been heated too long. So just pay attention when you melt your chocolate.
  • Why did my souffle not rise? – There are many reasons like over-mixing the batter or the oven wasn’t hot enough. But the most common reason would be the egg whites were not beaten to stiff peaks and therefore not strong enough to give the souffle it’s structure.
  • Why did my souffle crack? – It could be due to over-beaten egg whites resulting in a dry cracked souffle or most likely due to over baking.

How to make chocolate souffle in advance:

You can make this recipe 24 hours in advance. Just cover your ramekins with saran wrap and refrigerate until ready to bake. Remove the saran wrap, smooth the tops, run your thumb along the edge to make the channel, and bake for 1-2 minutes longer.

How to serve chocolate souffle:

It’s best to serve immediately. That way they are nice and warm and puffed up. The souffle will start to deflate soon after you take them out of the oven. Serve with a dusting of powdered sugar, a dollop of whipped cream, a drizzle of creme anglaise or a scoop vanilla ice cream if desired.

  • Category: dessert
  • Method: bake
  • Cuisine: American

Keywords: chocolate souffle recipe, easy chocolate souffles

I learned a lot about making souffles from Entertaining with Beth, which is what this recipe is loosely based on.

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